When Donald Trump was running for the Republican nomination, the so-called “Conservative Movement” was shaken. Some of its […]

The ascendance of Donald Trump has prompted many to look back and chart the factors and events that […]

In October 1978, Derrick Bell, Harvard Law professor and soon-to-be Dean of the University of Oregon School of […]

Anthropologist Constancio R. Arnaldo, Jr (Asian American Sporting Cultures, New York University Press, 2016) and historian Linda España-Maram (Creating […]

How place determines race for racially in-between immigrants. July 4, 2002, was a particularly humid Independence Day in […]

For our last big episode of the season, Doomed to Repeat is touching on one of the most […]

The auditorium was at capacity in Tampa Bay, Florida for the 2016 North American Society for the Sociology […]

The words of Franz Kafka will likely provide cold comfort to those who already know and understand the black American experience firsthand—those for whom the disaster and the suicide that Kafka references may be familiar to the point of being banal. To those of us who do not share the exact same experience, but who might know it from some kind of family resemblance—people from the Latino/a community, who find themselves marked for scrutiny, or the Arab-Americans, South Asians, and other brown people who also know what it is like to inhabit a body that is marked as dangerous or Other—it feels like a song hazily remembered but recognizable.