To borrow from our millennial friends, it is very on brand for the Tropics of Meta crew—composed mainly of Gen X Nirvana-loving kids who eat hot Cheetos and drink cold beer—to drop new books in a global pandemic.

Frank Herbert’s novel and Denis Villeneuve’s film borrow from Middle Eastern cultures, but what does that really mean?

In this short story, a group of teens confronts environmental racism and the invidious question: “Why don’t you just move?”

Marcos Gonsalez’s debut novel provides an occasion for reflection and healing in traumatic times, now and past.

Robinson’s “baggy monster” of a novel offers a daring and kaleidoscopic view of how humanity might actually grapple with impending climate catastrophe.

Le Carré elevated quit lit into something sublime and deserving of literary awards, unlike my overwrought internet Weltschmertz.

Inexplicably acclaimed, Rooney’s novel offers canned millennial gender play with a scrawny garnish of warmed-over Marxism.

Writer Murray Browne looks back at Pynchon’s novel, once heralded by critics as “bonecrushingly dense,” in light of the age of Qanon.